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National Geographic :: How Loved

Experience the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.
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2017/11/07 09:58:46
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Photo by @paleyphoto (Matthieu Paley). Moonrise over the Hindukush. Walking across the Pamir mountains on assignment for @natgeo / @outofedenwalk - follow @paleyphoto for more mountain images. #roofoftheworld #Hindukush #mountainworld #pyramid

2017/11/07 06:40:10
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Photo by @hammond_robin for @witness_change. “Since my daughter was born, she does not speak or walk… We can’t know what happened to her… Our biggest challenge is to get a good treatment so we could change her life," says Amidou of his 9 year-old daughter Dambouame, who lives with a mental health problem. "Seeing her like that really makes me pity. Girls of her age are not like that and it tears me to see her like that.” Amidou and Dambouame were photographed in the village of Sibor Toti in Northern Togo - one of the poorest regions in the west African country. Many mental health professionals point to poverty as a contributing factor towards the high number of people living with mental health problems. #InMyWorld exposes challenges faced by people living with mental health issues and gives them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. This first phase of the project was created in collaboration with Handicap International (@handicap_uk) as part of Witness Change's work on global mental health. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to end human rights violations for marginalized communities through visual storytelling. To see more from the project please follow @onedayinmyworld

2017/11/07 03:13:06
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Photo by @FransLanting If this photo had been made at Loch Ness it might create a sensation. But instead of a sea monster it shows an elephant swimming across the Chobe River between Botswana and Namibia with only the tip of its trunk visible above water. This boundary area is a crucial corridor for multitudes of elephants migrating between these two countries across fertile river floodplains and into the dry woodlands beyond. More than 100,000 elephants congregate in a region which many experts believe to be the last best place for elephants in Africa. This image is featured in our new book “Into Africa," which has just been released. It is based on the NatGeo exhibition with the same name. Follow me @FransLanting for more images and stories of wild Africa and to learn more about the book. @natgeocreative @the photosociety #Africa #Elephants #Botswana #Namibia #Conservation #Wild #Hope #Safari #SavetheElephants

2017/11/07 00:41:31
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photo by @chamiltonjames / Charlie Hamilton James - This week I have been working with a brave and dedicated group of fire fighters in the eastern Amazon. They protect the indigenous reserve of Arariboia, home to the Awã and the Guajaja people, from forest fires. Fire season here is just coming to an end as the first rains of the wet season arrive. This year has been a very busy time for the fire fighters who have tackled huge blazes in the territory. Armed with minimal equipment they have developed techniques and strategies to contain the fires but many get out of hand and burn huge areas of forest. The forest here is special; it is home to isolated Awã - tribes living in voluntary isolation from the outside world; often romantically described as ‘uncontacted’. The aim of the fire fighters is to protect their land and the land of the isolated people who’s rights they value enormously - even though they have never met them. The crews are made up of indigenous Guajaja and IBAMA fire fighters. This shot shows a manioc field on fire - many people in the area clear cut forest to grow manioc, they then burn the area to clear the dead wood before planting crops. This often gets out of control and burns the surrounding forest. Fortunately in this instance the fire was kept under control. On assignment for @natgeo in Brazil

2017/11/06 22:17:42
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Video @ladzinski / Shadows retreating back as the moon rises over Bolivia’s #eduardoabaroa national reserve. This reserve extends roughly 1.7 million acres and sits at an elevation ranging from 13,800 feet to 17,000 feet.

2017/11/06 20:21:28
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Photo by @BrianSkerry. Harp Seal Pups Kissing!  Two harp seal pups meet each other on the pack ice of Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawrence, touching noses as they sniff one another. Pups are generally born in this region during February, spending about two weeks nursing from their mothers before heading off into the frigid arctic waters on their own. The decline of sea ice over the last decade has created a serious crisis for these animals, as pup mortality rates have increased substantially. If the climate continues to warm and sea ice disappears, the future is uncertain for this species. To see more ocean wildlife, and to learn more about my experiences photographing for National Geographic, follow me, @BrianSkerry, on Instagram. @thephotosociety @natgeocreative #harp #seal #pup #canada #arctic #ice #photooftheday #nationalgeographic #natgeo #harpseal #climatechange #globalwarming #instagood #followme #follow #saveouroceans #ocean #photography #travelphoto #wonderlust #travelphotographer

2017/11/06 18:22:33
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Image by @joelsartore | Right now, in Central and Southern Mexico, monarch butterflies are finishing their incredible 3,000 mile and 4-generation journey from the US and Canada and are settling in for the winter. This generation of monarchs will live happily in these warm climates for six to eight months until it is time to begin the whole journey again. They will then migrate back north for the summer, landing on milkweed to lay eggs for a new generation, and providing pollination to many plants along the way. With butterfly season coming to a close, we are wrapping up our #pollinatormonday campaign. Thank you so much for following us on our journey this summer! Pollinator Mondays may be coming to an end, but helping pollinators should never stop. Continue to support pollinators and help save the Great Monarch Migration by planting milkweed in the summer months, avoiding mowing before fall, and choosing to practice organic lawn and garden care. You can always click the link in my bio to freshen up your knowledge about pollinators and to learn more about how to help. Thank you for choosing to be a #pollinantorhero! Let’s continue to #savetogether! . . #pollinators #butterflies #monarchs #migration #nature #conservation #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark

2017/11/06 15:46:41
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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto Nature is perfection. It gives us the air we breathe and the water we all need for our life. My @natgeo jaguar story come out soon in the December issue of National Geographic Magazine! and LOOK for our @ngwild Big Cat Week show filmed with @bertiegregory in Dec. 2017. Here is a cub trying to play with her mom - who is having nothing to do with it. Jaguars are the 3rd largest of the big cats. Found from US / Mexico border to northern Argentina. Jaguars have rebounded in this area where 95% of the land is privately owned. In the past many ranchers would kill the cats when they ate their cattle. Today in this area tourism brings in much more money to the local economy than cattle ranching. So the jaguar population is increasing. But revenge killings of jaguars happen close to this area and all throughout the jaguars range. Also poaching for skins, bones and teeth is growing for the first time since the 1970’s to feed the demand for Asian Traditional Medicine and luxury items from endangered species. “When the buying stops, the killing can too.” @wildaid My first story with big cats was the 1st @natgeo Jaguar story 20 years ago! It has changed my life working with the magical and magnificent cats of the world. Animals have emotions just like we have. Forests provide us with up to 50% of the oxygen we breathe - oceans the rest. They give us 75% of the fresh water. If we can save the forest of the Amazon and other areas in Central and South America for the JAGUAR and Puma. The forests of Central Africa for the leopard, lion, elephants etc. And the forests of South Asia for the Tigers and Leopards. If you save the top predator in any ecosystem you save everything that lives with them. So if - We Save Big Cats we can help Save Ourselves. Please visit CauseAnUproar.org to find out other ways to become involved to save big cats! #follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images from my work with @natgeo and Thanks!! @stevewinterphoto @natgeo @nglive #nglive @natgeochannel @natgeowild @thephotosociety @natgeocreative #fursforlife #BCI #bigcatsintiative @africanparksnetwork @jaguar #jaguar @bertiegregory

2017/11/06 14:56:44
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Video by @BertieGregory. A waterfall deep in the heart of the unexplored Chiribiquete National Park. I shot this from a helicopter whilst accompanying a team from Fundacion Herencia, an incredible group of people doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. This massive area boasts one of the largest protected areas of jaguar habitat in the world. It is also home to ancient paintings of jaguars, representing some of the earliest evidence of humans in South America. But despite its remoteness, it is still under threat. We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. Stay tuned for @stevewinterphoto ‘s upcoming jaguar story for @natgeo Magazine and our TV show for @natgeowild. Follow @bertiegregory for more wildlife adventures!

2017/11/06 12:36:49
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Photograph by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto - The eyes of Kathakali: there are 9 facial gestures that dancers perform in the classic Indian dance drama of Kerala. Totally mesmerizing to watch them dance with their eyes, each expression evoking a different human emotion. Guess which is this? #kathakali #eyes #dance #dancers #kerela #india @natgeocreative

2017/11/06 10:01:11
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Photo by @ciriljazbec / Entering Siorapaluk, one of the northernmost settlements on the planet, after taking five plane flights, one helicopter flight and a several hour dog sled ride over the sea ice. Inhabited by a few families the village faces a serious decline in population. Peter Simigag, a hunter from Qaanaaq, who is encircled by dogs, is visiting one of them. Follow more from my Arctic journey @ciriljazbec #Arctic #Greenland #northernmost #settlement

2017/11/05 22:52:38
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Photo @ladzinski / A #JamesFlamingo, mid flight over Bolivia’s thermal active #RedLagoon at sunrise. The James flamingo is a year round resident of the Andean Plateau, weathering the harsh Andean winter which can reach temperatures of -30 Fahrenheit. The James flamingo was long thought to be extinct until a small flock was rediscovered in 1956. To see what Red Lagoon looks like check my feed @ladzinski

2017/11/05 19:39:48
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Photo by: @renaeffendiphoto // A young birch tree pushes through the floorboards of a second floor inside a school sports gymnasium in the abandoned city of Prypiats. As a result of the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986 and the subsequent radioactive fallout the entire population of Prypiats was evacuated and never returned home. Nature has reclaimed the city that was previously home to over 40,000 people. Vegetation grows inside homes, wolves, deer and wild boar roam the empty streets. For more human interest stories follow @renaeffendiphoto @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #nature #environment #nuclear #disaster #chernobyl #ukraine #trees

2017/11/05 17:08:17
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photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - the skeleton of a dodo (raphus cucullatus) from the 16th century (or possibly earlier) During the month of September in the year 1598 a flotilla of ships belonging to the Dutch East India Company drew close to a mysterious island far out in the Indian Ocean. As far as anyone knows, no human had ever set foot on it, those who came ashore found themselves in a land of reptiles and birds: the only mammals were those that could fly or swim there. Birds were everywhere, one in particular stood out - a large fat creature equipped with an enormous beak; and so, man’s relationship with the dodo began. As we now know the relationship didn’t go well for the dodo. After many months at sea the birds presented a tasty alternative to the sailors usual diet; the birds couldn’t fly, they had no need to, they had no predators, so the catching was comparatively easy. With man came dogs, cats, monkeys, pigs, and rats. All preyed rapaciously on the birds and their eggs. By the year 1680 (or possibly earlier) the dodo was gone. All that was left were one or two poorly stuffed examples, a series of paintings, most of them produced by a dutch artist called Roelandt Savery, and a few written descriptions. So, less than 100 years after its discovery, the dodo passed into history. Over the next two centuries the dodo became something of a footnote in the tale of natural history. Some naturalists even began to deny that it had existed. Then during the 1860’s a great collection of bones arrived in London, all of them from the dodo. These had been found in a marsh on Mauritius by a school master, Charles Clarke. He had sent workers into water at the centre of the marsh, about 3ft deep, where bones had begun to turn up. Feeling with their naked feet they discovered the bones of many dodo’s. From these bones London’s Natural History Museum was able to assemble an almost complete skeleton. A very few reasonably complete skeletons have, over the years been assembled from these bones. From this time onwards the dodo’s rise to become one of the the great icons of extinction was as unstoppable as its demise at the hand of man #everydayextinction

2017/11/05 16:17:50
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Photo by @katieorlinsky: A curious teenage male polar bear investigating the hood of my truck in Kaktovik, an Inupiat native village in the Alaskan Arctic. Every fall after the community’s annual subsistence hunt of bowhead whales, more and more polar bears arrive to feed off the whale carcass' scraps and bones. Climate change has affected the migration and diet of polar bears, who have grown increasingly hungry as melting sea ice impairs their ability to hunt seals on the Arctic Ocean ice sheet. Meanwhile, scavenging so close to town brings its own set of challenges to both polar bears and the people of Kaktovik. With a steady stream of tourists and scientists coming to view and study the polar bears year after year, bears grow increasingly accustomed to interaction with humans-the most dangerous predator on the planet.

2017/10/05 02:24:42
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Photo by @FransLanting “Eye to Eye” Inside every animal is an individual with its own emotions and needs. When I photograph animals I try to bring out their personalities just as people photographers do that with their subjects. In Belize I spent several hours with this magnificent male cougar before he relaxed to a dreamy pose that I felt captured his mood. I share this image to recognize World Animal Day, October 4—a day of action for animal rights and welfare. The date coincides with the feast day for Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of animals. Follow me @FransLanting for more images of the other beings on the great tree of life. @natgeotravel @thephotosociety @natgeocreative #cougar #mountainLion #puma #bigcats #photooftheday #picoftheday #nature #beauty #naturelovers #animal #wildlife #worldanimalday

2017/10/23 21:45:51
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@stevewinterphoto @natgeo Today is International Snow Leopard Day!!! Photo by @stevewinterphoto for @natgeo Snow leopards are the ghosts of the high mountain areas of central Asia in which they live. The areas in which SL’s live are vitally important as they provide water for 100’s of millions of people. But the glaciers that provide the water are rapidly disappearing, which begs the question - what will the future bring for people and animals? Local people need to benefit from living with predators - snow leopards are persecuted by revenge killings - when they kill someone’s livestock a herder will then kill them. There are great community conservation projects where local herders can protect their flocks, making more money and saving snow leopards at the same time! Turning and economic negative into an economic positive - and saving snow leopards at the same time! Please visit National Geographic’s Big Cat Initiative @ CauseAnUproar.org, to find out ways to become involved - to save big cats! Check out - Panthera, Snow Leopard Trust, WCS, UNDP, WildAid - Environmental Investigation Agency - Wildlife Protection Society of India, @stevewinterphoto @natgeo @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #leopards #tigers #lions #snowleopard #jaguars @bigcatsforever #undp #gef @africanparksnetwork @leonardodicapriofdn

2017/11/06 20:21:28
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Photo by @BrianSkerry. Harp Seal Pups Kissing!  Two harp seal pups meet each other on the pack ice of Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawrence, touching noses as they sniff one another. Pups are generally born in this region during February, spending about two weeks nursing from their mothers before heading off into the frigid arctic waters on their own. The decline of sea ice over the last decade has created a serious crisis for these animals, as pup mortality rates have increased substantially. If the climate continues to warm and sea ice disappears, the future is uncertain for this species. To see more ocean wildlife, and to learn more about my experiences photographing for National Geographic, follow me, @BrianSkerry, on Instagram. @thephotosociety @natgeocreative #harp #seal #pup #canada #arctic #ice #photooftheday #nationalgeographic #natgeo #harpseal #climatechange #globalwarming #instagood #followme #follow #saveouroceans #ocean #photography #travelphoto #wonderlust #travelphotographer

2017/11/04 02:21:16
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Photo by @jimmy_chin It's about your point of view. @conrad_anker has a good one. Purcell Mountains, British Columbia.

2017/10/17 19:25:01
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Photo by @chamiltonjames \ Charlie Hamilton James. A rabbit bounds through a camera trap near Big Piney, Wyoming. The camera trap was set up to photograph animals moving through the sage brush desert - specifically for bobcats. I generally leave the cameras out for months in order to get images of as many different species as possible. Yesterday I checked this camera and I've clearly set it up in an area very popular with rabbits and not bobcats as I seem to have hundreds of images of them. Shot on assignment for @natgeo

2017/10/09 00:41:42
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Photo @ladzinski / Architectural collision of modern an ancient, Rome’s #Colosseum.

2017/11/05 16:17:50
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Photo by @katieorlinsky: A curious teenage male polar bear investigating the hood of my truck in Kaktovik, an Inupiat native village in the Alaskan Arctic. Every fall after the community’s annual subsistence hunt of bowhead whales, more and more polar bears arrive to feed off the whale carcass' scraps and bones. Climate change has affected the migration and diet of polar bears, who have grown increasingly hungry as melting sea ice impairs their ability to hunt seals on the Arctic Ocean ice sheet. Meanwhile, scavenging so close to town brings its own set of challenges to both polar bears and the people of Kaktovik. With a steady stream of tourists and scientists coming to view and study the polar bears year after year, bears grow increasingly accustomed to interaction with humans-the most dangerous predator on the planet.

2017/10/29 01:51:43
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Photo by @christian_foto ( Christian Rodriguez ) Guerrero is the number one producer of poppy flower in Mexico. On a global scale, Guerrero shares the first place with Afghanistan. Mexico provides more than 90 percent of US’s heroin. The poppy flower has become an economic support for many families in the "Sierra de Guerrero" ( Guerrero mountain chain), since it is much more profitable than any other crop. Due to the high poverty rates, many peasants prefer to grow the poppy flower in order to cover their basic needs. There is a direct link between violence in Mexico and the records of heroin use in the United States. During the last decade, heroin use in the United States has increased fivefold and addiction has tripled. Photo by @christian_foto #Guerrero #poppy #heroin #mexico

2017/11/01 17:49:17
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photo by @chamiltonjames / Charlie Hamilton James - Ayhua with her pet monkey. Ayhua is from the Awã, indigenous people of the eastern Brazilian Amazon. Her family came out of isolation in 1989 and she has lived in ‘contact’ ever since. Some Awã remain in voluntary isolation in the state of Maranhão and are considered highly vulnerable as threats to their land, particularly from logging, are considerable. The Awã like to keep wild animals as pets but seem to have a particular love of monkeys - many Awã women keep small tamarin monkeys as pets and often keep them on their heads. Shot on assignment for @natgeo

2017/10/28 13:49:33
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Photograph by @paulnicklen // The locals call him Niño, which in Spanish means “boy.” He is only eight or nine feet long but that does not mean he lacks confidence. If I got too close he would gently remind me to back off by slowly opening up his mouth. He is definitely not as scary as he looks. #follow me on @paulnicklen to see a much larger croc follow me at night in the mangroves of Cuba. #gratitude #nature #cuba #TurningTheTide with @sea_legacy #adventure #explore #instagood #smile #picoftheday #instagood #instadaily

2017/10/18 01:29:11
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Photo: @andy_mann // An offshore breaker forms and spills over a deep seamount in the Savage Islands a few minutes after we surface from a deep dive. The rocky islands, located 200 miles off shore are visible through the barrel. Moments like this stop you in your tracks and have a way of slowing down time. The ocean holds so many secrets. Shot #onassignment for @natgeopristineseas // #followme @andy_mann to see this wave turn into a sea monster.

2017/10/04 00:19:42
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Photo by @amivitale. Mpala takes a plop and a rest among the chaos of the mud hole fun at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e) inside the boma in #Kenya. These #elephants were rescued after being orphaned or abandoned — some due to drought and environmental conditions, some due to poaching. They are under the care of wildlife keepers recruited from the local community, who also lead the sanctuary and the nearby Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy until they are old enough to be released back into the wild. This is the first wild life sanctuary owned and run by the indigenous community in all of #Africa. Much needed attention has been focused on the plight of wildlife but very little has been said about the indigenous communities on the frontline and the incredible work they do to protect these animals. These communities hold the key to saving Africa's great animals. Read my story in the August issue of the magazine or online and follow @amivitale and @r.e.s.c.u.e to support and learn more about these initiatives. @nrt_kenya @lewa_wildlife @conservationorg @tusk_org @kenyawildlifeservice @sandiegozoo @thephotosociety

2017/11/02 10:21:10
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Photo by @stephenwilkes. Italy pulls you in, and makes you feel welcomed and relaxed. As I went to explore the shores of Lake Como, in Bellagio I was drawn into the landscape and the sparkling waters that were being enjoyed by this family below. No matter what the time of day, there’s always some magic on Lake Como. To see more images like this, please follow me @stephenwilkes. #italy #lakecomo #bellagio #moments #landscape #lakelife #water #family #inspired

2017/10/06 15:23:10
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Image by @joelsartore | The Mexican gray wolf once ruled the American Southwest, but as the arrival of humans and livestock increased, they began to be viewed as pests. By 1973, trapping, poison and rifles had completely eliminated the wild Mexican gray wolf populations in the U.S., leaving only a handful alive in captivity. To save this keystone species, an unprecedented breeding program was put in place and, in 1998, eleven Mexican gray wolves were eventually released back into the wilds of Arizona. Today about 100 survive on their own, a better number for sure, but the wolf still remains one of the rarest land animals on Earth. So what to do? Allowing the wolves to establish territories in many suitable habitats in remote locations will help prevent inbreeding. Biologists hope to target areas with abundant wild prey and few roads such as the vast forested areas around the Grand Canyon, up into Utah, over to New Mexico and into parts of Colorado. A minimum population of 750 wolves in the wild would help ensure that the species will stay genetically distinct enough to survive well into the future. Check out @joelsartore to see another image of this beautiful wolf. . . #wolves #mexicangraywolf #lobo #lobos #wolf #AmericanSouthwest #Arizona #Newmexico #Texas #mexico #rare #endangeredspecies #endangered #rareanimals #conservation #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #nature #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark

2017/10/16 16:30:29
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Photo: @andy_mann // An expressive Oceanic Whitetip Shark off the coast of Cat Island, Bahamas. Assessed as Critically Endangered in the Western Central Atlantic due to enormous declines in their population, some studies show a decline of over 99% in the last 30 years. For three years I've been working in the Bahamas with great organizations and biologists to tag and track pregnant female Whitetips, in hopes of learning where this evasive, pelagic shark goes to give birth. It is an absolute honor to be the water this this amazing shark. If we can find and protect their nursing grounds maybe we can help save this species from extinction. // #followme @andy_mann to see a frightening moment when I was suddenly startled at the surface by an unseen Whitetip.